Earthquakes


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Displaying real-time earthquakes and plate boundaries in Google Earth format.


***http://earthquake.usgs.gov/recenteqsww/catalogs/eqs7day-M2.5.kml
eqs7day-depth-1.kmz

+http://www.data.gov/download/34/kml

Earthquakes will be broadcast within a few minutes for California events, and within 30-minutes for world-wide events. Earthquakes refresh every 5-minutes in Google Earth.
Earthquake Hazards Program.

An earthquake (also known as a quake, tremor or temblor) is the result of a sudden release of energy in the Earth’s crust that creates seismic waves. The seismicity or seismic activity of an area refers to the frequency, type and size of earthquakes experienced over a period of time. Earthquakes are measured using observations from seismometers. The moment magnitude is the most common scale on which earthquakes larger than approximately 5 are reported for the entire globe.

Earthquake_Fault_Types

There are three main types of fault that may cause an earthquake: normal, reverse (thrust) and strike-slip. Normal and reverse faulting are examples of dip-slip, where the displacement along the fault is in the direction of dip and movement on them involves a vertical component. Normal faults occur mainly in areas where the crust is being extended such as a divergent boundary. Reverse faults occur in areas where the crust is being shortened such as at a convergent boundary. Strike-slip faults are steep structures where the two sides of the fault slip horizontally past each other; transform boundaries are a particular type of strike-slip fault. Many earthquakes are caused by movement on faults that have components of both dip-slip and strike-slip; this is known as oblique slip.

The more numerous earthquakes smaller than magnitude 5 reported by national seismological observatories are measured mostly on the local magnitude scale, also referred to as the Richter scale. These two scales are numerically similar over their range of validity. Magnitude 3 or lower earthquakes are mostly almost imperceptible and magnitude 7 and over potentially cause serious damage over large areas, depending on their depth. The largest earthquakes in historic times have been of magnitude slightly over 9, although there is no limit to the possible magnitude. The most recent large earthquake of magnitude 9.0 or larger was a 9.0 magnitude earthquake in Japan in 2011 (as of March 2011), and it was the largest Japanese earthquake since records began. Intensity of shaking is measured on the modified Mercalli scale. The shallower an earthquake, the more damage to structures it causes, all else being equal.

At the Earth’s surface, earthquakes manifest themselves by shaking and sometimes displacement of the ground. When the epicenter of a large earthquake is located offshore, the seabed may be displaced sufficiently to cause a tsunami. Earthquakes can also trigger landslides, and occasionally volcanic activity.

In its most general sense, the word earthquake is used to describe any seismic event — whether natural or caused by humans — that generates seismic waves. Earthquakes are caused mostly by rupture of geological faults, but also by other events such as volcanic activity, landslides, mine blasts, and nuclear tests. An earthquake’s point of initial rupture is called its focus or hypocenter. The epicenter is the point at ground level directly above the hypocenter.

Latest Earthquakes: Feeds & Data

Earthquakes from the last day: (most recent first)

U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey

 

USGS M 5+ Earthquakes
Real-time, worldwide earthquake list
USGS M 0+ Earthquakes
Real-time, worldwide earthquake list

M 7+ earthquakes

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USGS M 0+ Earthquakes: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/catalogs/

Real-time, worldwide earthquake list for the past day

RSS Feed Link: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/catalogs/eqs1day-M0.xml

Earthquake Hazards Program

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Earthquake Hazard Maps

How to Read the Maps

The maps displayed below show how earthquake hazards vary across the United States. Hazards are measured as the likelihood of experiencing earthquake shaking of various intensities.

The colors in the maps denote “seismic design categories” (SDCs), which reflect the likelihood of experiencing earthquake shaking of various intensities. (Building design and construction professionals use SDCs specified in building codes to determine the level of seismic resistance required for new buildings.)

The following table describes the hazard level associated with each SDC, and the associated levels of shaking. Although stronger shaking is possible in each SDC, it is less probable than the shaking described.

SDC Map Color Earthquake Hazard Potential Effects of Shaking*
A White Very small probability of experiencing damaging earth­quake effects.
B Gray Could experience shaking of moderate intensity. Moderate shaking—Felt by all, many frightened. Some heavy furniture moved; a few instances of fallen plaster. Damage slight.
C Yellow Could experience strong shaking. Strong shaking—Damage negligible in buildings of good design and construction; slight to moderate in well-built ordinary structures; considerable damage in poorly built structures.
D0D1D2 Light brownDarker brownDarkest brown Could experience very strong shaking (the darker the color, the stronger the shaking). Very strong shaking—Damage slight in specially designed structures; considerable damage in ordinary substantial buildings with partial collapse. Damage great in poorly built structures.
E Red Near major active faults capable of producing the most intense shaking. Strongest shaking—Damage considerable in specially designed structures; frame structures thrown out of plumb. Damage great in substantial buildings, with partial collapse. Buildings shifted off foundations. Shaking intense enough to completely destroy buildings.
* Abbreviated descriptions from The Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale.

SDCs take into account the type of soil at the site, as poor soils can significantly increase earthquake shaking. These maps have simplified this by assuming normal Site Class “C” soils, which are the most commonly found.

When viewing the maps, it is important to remember that areas with high earthquake hazards do not necessarily face high seismic risks. Defined as the losses that are likely to result from exposure to earthquake hazards, seismic risks are determined not only by hazard levels but also by the amount of people and property that are exposed to the hazards, and by how vulnerable people and property are to the hazards. This is explained in more detail in Your Earthquake Risk.

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Maps

SDC map of the Eastern United States for low-rise Occupancy Category I and II structures located on sites with average alluvial soil conditions.

SDC map of the Eastern United States for low-rise Occupancy Category I and II structures located on sites with average alluvial soil conditions.

SDC map of the Western United States for low-rise Occupancy Category I and II structures located on sites with average alluvial soil conditions.

SDC map of the Western United States for low-rise Occupancy Category I and II structures located on sites with average alluvial soil conditions.

SDC map of Alaska for low-rise Occupancy Category I and II structures located on sites with average alluvial soil conditions.

SDC map of Alaska for low-rise Occupancy Category I and II structures located on sites with average alluvial soil conditions.

SDC map of Hawaii for low-rise Occupancy Category I and II structures located on sites with average alluvial soil conditions.

SDC map of Hawaii for low-rise Occupancy Category I and II structures located on sites with average alluvial soil conditions.

SDC map of Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, and Tortola for low-rise Occupancy Category I and II structures located on sites with average alluvial soil conditions.

SDC map of Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, and Tortola for low-rise Occupancy Category I and II structures located on sites with average alluvial soil conditions.

 

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USGS M 2.5+ Earthquakes
Real-time, worldwide earthquake list for the past day

 

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Seismic Activity
Link

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Earthquake Map

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/catalogs/index.php#csv

link: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/catalogs/eqs1day-M0.xml
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Article: James Roddey; ‘Prophet of doom’ calls for better U.S. quake preparation

(CNN) — Earthquake scientist James Roddey is known up and down the Oregon coast as the “prophet of doom” — a nickname that seems even more ominous after the disaster in Japan.

As an earth science officer for the state, Roddey educates communities on how to prepare and survive the earthquake and tsunami that he predicts is virtually inevitable.

“They want to know more. They want to know what they can do,” said Roddey, who spoke to CNN on Monday shortly before his scheduled appearance at an Oregon school near Gold Beach. He’s the bearer of bad news. Very bad news: there’s a one-in-three chance that a major quake will strike the region by 2061, according to Oregon State University scientists.

A nation’s mindset surrounding disaster preparedness is directly linked to disaster frequency, say experts. But even in California, where so many quakes have occurred, less than 10% of residents have earthquake insurance, Michel-Kerjan said.

dataappeal-feel-it.kmz

1) http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/catalogs/eqs7day-depth.kmz

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